U.S. foreign policy on N. Korea

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

If there is one thing about the U.S. foreign policy it is “consistently inconsistent!”  U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice has said repeatedly over the last several years that there would be no bilateral talks between the U.S. and N. Korea.  Contrary to views of most Asian Analysts who have been encouraging that the U.S. should have bilateral meetings.  Well, _42381289_north_korea_map203_2.gifjust this month in a secret meeting the U.S. agreed to have bilateral talks with N. Korea which has turn into N. Korea reaching a deal over its nuclear program. 

China’s chief envoy Wu Dawei said the deal was “favorable for the peace process in north-east Asia and for the improvement of ties between relevant countries”.

So what will N. Korea have to do?  Under the agreement, Pyongyang has pledged to close its Yongbyon reactor within 60 days, in return for 50,000 metric tons of fuel aid or economic aid of equal value. The closure of Yongbyon will be verified by international inspectors.

The North will eventually receive another one million tons of fuel oil or an equivalent when it permanently disables its nuclear operations.

It is my opinion that this deal could have been made years ago if only the Bush Administration have the policy of open talks.  You can not resolve issues without negotiations taking place.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

About CD